Cobra Kai Derby Coach

You can't bend the rules unless you know the rules.
A long time ago I asked the question “how do you pronounce WFTDA?”There were lots of different answers. The double you eff tee dee aye, woof ta dah (aka “the dog magician”), wif duh, wif tu duh, and half a dozen others. The point I was leading to is that derby is not monolithic. Leagues are individual cultures, even though most skaters think all other leagues are exactly the same as theirs because they’re all playing the same sport. This is something I try to remember when I post, not only to keep up my secret identity schtick, but also because it leads to all sorts of confusion when you use terms that are standard in your league but mean totally different things in others. Just a few weeks ago someone responded to a CKDC post using an abbreviation for the name of a non-standard NSO position that I’d never heard before. I had to look it up and make an educated guess as to what they were talking about. These individual culture issues apply to refs as much, if not more than skaters. So much ref training depends on word-of-mouth folklore about how to interpret and enforce unclear rules there ends up being a lot of difference from league to league and bout to bout in how things work. One thing I’ve seen is that many HRs have a pet penalty they focus on, while their knowledge of others areas could be quite weak. I’ve known veteran refs who can quote the entire penalty box section word for word but miss basic uniform violations. And vice versa. Players tend to be blind to this if they only know their own league. Then on bout day suddenly rules are being enforced in different ways than they’ve gotten used to. 20 ft of bridging is suddenly 3 feet more or less than they thought it was. 3 seconds of touching another player is now 2. Or 5. This is why it’s so important to play with as many other leagues as possible.

The same is true for scrimmaging. All too many new players get used to how to block or pass their teammates and are then lost on bout day. 

The differences in leagues show up not only in play and officiating but also in organization, finance, rules knowledge, training, strategy, treatment of NSOs, competitiveness vs social, relationships with refs, conflict resolution, etc. If you’ve only ever skated in one place, you have no idea how different the culture can be in a different league. Think about what flavour your league’s kool aid is and what it must taste like in other places.

A long time ago I asked the question “how do you pronounce WFTDA?”

There were lots of different answers. The double you eff tee dee aye, woof ta dah (aka “the dog magician”), wif duh, wif tu duh, and half a dozen others. The point I was leading to is that derby is not monolithic. Leagues are individual cultures, even though most skaters think all other leagues are exactly the same as theirs because they’re all playing the same sport.

This is something I try to remember when I post, not only to keep up my secret identity schtick, but also because it leads to all sorts of confusion when you use terms that are standard in your league but mean totally different things in others.

Just a few weeks ago someone responded to a CKDC post using an abbreviation for the name of a non-standard NSO position that I’d never heard before. I had to look it up and make an educated guess as to what they were talking about.

These individual culture issues apply to refs as much, if not more than skaters. So much ref training depends on word-of-mouth folklore about how to interpret and enforce unclear rules there ends up being a lot of difference from league to league and bout to bout in how things work. One thing I’ve seen is that many HRs have a pet penalty they focus on, while their knowledge of others areas could be quite weak.

I’ve known veteran refs who can quote the entire penalty box section word for word but miss basic uniform violations. And vice versa.

Players tend to be blind to this if they only know their own league. Then on bout day suddenly rules are being enforced in different ways than they’ve gotten used to. 20 ft of bridging is suddenly 3 feet more or less than they thought it was. 3 seconds of touching another player is now 2. Or 5. This is why it’s so important to play with as many other leagues as possible.

The same is true for scrimmaging. All too many new players get used to how to block or pass their teammates and are then lost on bout day.

The differences in leagues show up not only in play and officiating but also in organization, finance, rules knowledge, training, strategy, treatment of NSOs, competitiveness vs social, relationships with refs, conflict resolution, etc.

If you’ve only ever skated in one place, you have no idea how different the culture can be in a different league.

Think about what flavour your league’s kool aid is and what it must taste like in other places.

Make me fan art!

That feels really strange to say, but, y’know, if you wanted to, it’d totally be cool. I’ll post it and link to whatever other interesting stuff you do.

I’d love to see other people’s version of a snake in a skate.

derbytastic:

— DNN IS CLOSED FOR BUSINESS —- “Seven years of recaps, previews, comprehensive score listings, analysis articles, It Ain’t At All Like Being There™ live text boutcasts, Power Rankings, OUTRAGE!, string-and-tin-can video streams, then with score and clock overlays, then with multi-camera switching. Seven years of incredible people — hundreds of them — pulling together to do incredible things with incredibly inadequate resources, all out of a shared love for this sport and its community. Seven years is enough. As of today, Derby News Network is retired. Why? It has been a terrifically rewarding experience, building a site and a community and a family. It has also taken a terrible toll on the principals who built it and held it together: in stress, in emotional and physical health, in personal finances, in our availability to our families and friends. We’re not here to linger on these costs, but we’ve decided, together, that we will no longer bear them. Here’s what happens now: The DNN website will remain up for the near future, but will no longer be updated. All written content on DNN is already shared under the CC-BY license, which means anyone can reuse it for any purpose, so long as it is credited. Attribution must take the form of “By [author name] for Derby News Network”. Scrape away. Please remember that photographs on the site *may not* be used for any purpose, because the photographers licensed them to DNN only for use on DNN. We cannot stress enough how important it is that you respect the rights of these creators. We’ve cancelled out all recurring contributions in Paypal, so ongoing donors will not be debited any further. We’re giving the full contents of the Derbymatic bout database to the great people at Flat Track Stats, in case there’s any of it that they don’t already have. Derbylife will live on independently under Em Dash’s continued stewardship. We’d really like to list every single person and entity who has contributed words, voices, photos, scores, logistics help, sponsorship support, personal funds, reputations, and love to create DNN — but that list would run to over a thousand names, and couldn’t possibly be complete. You know who you are. We love you like family. We invite you to join us in memoriam on the DNN facebook page with your memories and photos. In the final tally, let the recap note that we played our hearts out and left it all on the track. Signed, Gnosis, Justice, Mercy, Hurt, Dash, and Lex” RIP DNN D: ~ Sellty

derbytastic:

— DNN IS CLOSED FOR BUSINESS —-
“Seven years of recaps, previews, comprehensive score listings, analysis articles, It Ain’t At All Like Being There™ live text boutcasts, Power Rankings, OUTRAGE!, string-and-tin-can video streams, then with score and clock overlays, then with multi-camera switching. Seven years of incredible people — hundreds of them — pulling together to do incredible things with incredibly inadequate resources, all out of a shared love for this sport and its community.

Seven years is enough. As of today, Derby News Network is retired.

Why?

It has been a terrifically rewarding experience, building a site and a community and a family. It has also taken a terrible toll on the principals who built it and held it together: in stress, in emotional and physical health, in personal finances, in our availability to our families and friends. We’re not here to linger on these costs, but we’ve decided, together, that we will no longer bear them.

Here’s what happens now:

The DNN website will remain up for the near future, but will no longer be updated.
All written content on DNN is already shared under the CC-BY license, which means anyone can reuse it for any purpose, so long as it is credited. Attribution must take the form of “By [author name] for Derby News Network”. Scrape away.
Please remember that photographs on the site *may not* be used for any purpose, because the photographers licensed them to DNN only for use on DNN. We cannot stress enough how important it is that you respect the rights of these creators.
We’ve cancelled out all recurring contributions in Paypal, so ongoing donors will not be debited any further.
We’re giving the full contents of the Derbymatic bout database to the great people at Flat Track Stats, in case there’s any of it that they don’t already have.
Derbylife will live on independently under Em Dash’s continued stewardship.
We’d really like to list every single person and entity who has contributed words, voices, photos, scores, logistics help, sponsorship support, personal funds, reputations, and love to create DNN — but that list would run to over a thousand names, and couldn’t possibly be complete.

You know who you are. We love you like family.

We invite you to join us in memoriam on the DNN facebook page with your memories and photos.

In the final tally, let the recap note that we played our hearts out and left it all on the track.

Signed,

Gnosis, Justice, Mercy, Hurt, Dash, and Lex”

RIP DNN D:
~ Sellty

derbytastic:

erraticserenity:

My face while watching the Gotham vs Denver bout. I’m sorry, but Gotham is just boring to watch these days. The only jams that are fun are when Denver gets lead and it doesn’t just look like a Gotham practice.

Yep I was making the same face. I think the world just needs to see Gotham get beat my 100+ points or just plain ol’ lose JUST TO KNOW that aren’t flawless. Cos so far they are pretty damn close to perfect. Which is kinda scarey. Who will stop the Gotham machine?

My reaction to Gotham bouts is getting pissed that all other teams aren’t good enough. Why doesn’t everyone work until they’re on that level?

derbytastic:

erraticserenity:

My face while watching the Gotham vs Denver bout. I’m sorry, but Gotham is just boring to watch these days. The only jams that are fun are when Denver gets lead and it doesn’t just look like a Gotham practice.

Yep I was making the same face. I think the world just needs to see Gotham get beat my 100+ points or just plain ol’ lose JUST TO KNOW that aren’t flawless. Cos so far they are pretty damn close to perfect. Which is kinda scarey. Who will stop the Gotham machine?

My reaction to Gotham bouts is getting pissed that all other teams aren’t good enough. Why doesn’t everyone work until they’re on that level?

trollerderby:

Cuando no sos lead y podés robar puntos.
When you are not the lead jammer and manage to steal points.

I saw this happen several times (with slightly less pelvic thrusting) at a bout this weekend. One team apparently didn’t know that you can score until the fourth whistle, so they kept giving away points despite being lead.

trollerderby:

Cuando no sos lead y podés robar puntos.

When you are not the lead jammer and manage to steal points.

I saw this happen several times (with slightly less pelvic thrusting) at a bout this weekend. One team apparently didn’t know that you can score until the fourth whistle, so they kept giving away points despite being lead.

One Is Cobra approved, cont 2...

rollerderbyurkel:


I have always figured that if I get really, really f*cked as a jammer that I am going to turn around, skate clockwise to the front of the engagement zone, wait for the other jammer to emerge, and yell “surprise, motherfucker” in my best Doakes voice.

YES!

Points Per Jam: Roller Derby's Default Difficulty

Windyman’s going deep into the statistics on this one. I’m going to have to go back and read it a few more times to fully understand it. What I’ve gotten from it so far:
-The scores are too damn high!
-“In the WFTDA, playing defense means “stop the jammer.”….In the RDCL, MADE, and USARS, playing defense means “stop the team.””

But mostly, I’ve decided that within all the rulesets there exist the seeds of ONE sport that could be successful in the long term if everyone got over themselves and worked together.

One Is Cobra approved, cont 2…

For point #2, she had a couple of options other than taking the beating. Main one would be skating much further back than she had to and trying to either gain enough momentum to juke or wait for the other jammer and make with the human shield.

She had lots of options. She chose one of the least productive. The only thing worse would have been getting herself ejected.

It isn’t that surprising. Her team has a reputation for skating without much finesse or strategy.